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This week's Spin: Snagglepuss and The Wizard of Oz
Blog
Posted on Jun 03 2014 by Greg


Today's record: A Hanna-Barbera version of L. Frank Baum's classic plus an unusual children's record version, too.







The next best thing to being there for Blair
Blog, Movies, People, Books
Posted on May 21 2014 by Greg


Cinderella, Alice, Peter Pan, Johnny Appleseed, The Three Caballeros…it’s a small world...



Only a few of the iconic Disney productions touched by the magic brush of painter, stylist, designer and conceptual innovator Mary Blair.



This multi-story mosaic mural still graces Disney's Contemporary Resort in Florida...



and her work extends into children's books (including the still-in-print Little Golden Book "I Can Fly" (below), home furnishings, advertising -- she even did the color design for the movie version of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.



The Walt Disney Family Museum is presenting a spectacular, once-in-a-lifetime exhibit of her amazing work now through September 7.




If you have not been to this fabulous (genuinely) interactive museum yet, this is your excuse to finally experience it. But even if you cannot make it there, curator John Canemaker has lovingly assembled a treasure trove of these art pieces in a new book with the same name as the exhibit: Magic, Color, Flair: The World of Mary Blair.



This new book goes to great lengths to build upon the foundation Canemaker established with his earlier book, The Art and Flair of Mary Blair, which has just been reissued in a new edition. There is so much great art that you’ll be surprised to discover how little the two books overlap. In other words, yes, it’s worth having both volumes.




Mary Blair is also part of the august group of artists represented in Charles Solomon’s new book, The Art of the Disney Golden Books. Inside, you’ll see images of the worlds of Disney that you may have entered yourself through these beloved books. I know I spent hours “living” inside them.



So did animation giants such as Brave co-director Brenda Chapman, Toy Story art director Ralph Eggleston, Monsters, Inc. and Up director Pete Docter, Beauty and the Beast animator Glen Keane and Lilo and Stitch director Chris Sanders, as well as master illustrators Peter Emslie and Russell Schroeder. All of them and more offer personal and professional insights into why these books mean so much to all of us.



Like Disney Theme Parks, movies and music, you didn’t just stare passively at Disney Golden Books—you entered them and lived in their world. And you can do it now in the new book, The Art of Disney Golden Books.



“I can’t tell you how many times Mary Blair comes up in discussions, or an illustration somebody saw in a Golden Book,” says Up Producer Jonas Rivera in this book. “They really are a source of a lot of the color, inspiration and storytelling here at Pixar.”


[http://www.waltdisney.org/ ]

[http://www.waltdisney.org/mary-blair]

 








DVD REVIEW: 20 Feet from Stardom
Blog, Movies, People, Music, Records
Posted on May 13 2014 by Greg


I'm so glad this film won the Oscar.

When you learn about Darlene Love's astonishing career, check out her performance at this year's Oscar ceremony (the one with "Adele Dazeem"). You'll give her a standing ovation, too.

As you will for the mega-talented singers who you'll also meet in this film that -- and it's about time -- gives credit where credit is due, to the mega-talented studio and background singers who toiled behind the headliners (hence the title) and/or gave the world gigantic hit performances but were robbed of proper acknowledgement.

Also after watching this film, go back and look at the liner notes of your pop music albums. You'll see their names. Over and over again.

This documentary also questions the issue of what constitutes "stardom" and true "success." Becoming rich and famous relies on talent, luck, persistence and being at the right place at the right time -- yet some do not achieve it with all four. Yet, is a life well lived, working in a art form that you love, its own reward. Is the grass always greener? Is being content synonymous with "settling?"

I don't think being able to hold onto who are and what is dear to you is "settling." Regardless of being famous or being "niche," integrity matters, quality matters, and these artists exemplify these attributes.

Even if they aren't household names, how many of the biggest name in entertainment remembered by the general public after more than a few decades? What matters is what they have given us to enjoy and cherish. That is what lives on.

Cheers to you, great makers of music magic.









BOOK REVIEW: "Creativity, Inc." by Disney/Pixar's Ed Catmull
Blog, Movies, People, Books
Posted on Apr 17 2014 by Greg


For Pixar and Disney fans, this book is required reading because it details the evolution of Pixar, all the way to the merger with Disney -- with most of the bumps encountered on the journey.

If you wonder "How does Pixar do it?" with an unbroken record of box office hits and the pinnacle of CG animation excellence, Ed Catmull details the achievements and challenges. One challenge was actually the many big achievements.

Catmull strikes me as the "Roy Disney" or "Frank Wells" of the trio of John Lasseter, the late Steve Jobs and himself. Though he is accessible and far from a shrinking violet, he stays mostly in the background as the "business guy" and lets the people of the studio take center stage.

The hard part of reading this book -- and marveling at how Pixar combined innovative management techniques with some classic organizational tenets (even if Catmull doesn't know they existed before) to constantly address issues that never go away -- is wondering just how plausible it is to expect in other work environments.

It has to come from the top down. Pixar evolved its own heritage, which was somewhat in line with Walt Disney, but markedly different in several ways -- especially in that they don't want Pixar to fizzle with the depature/loss of an individual visionary.

But can your workplace allow a "Brain Trust" in which all could speak freely about each other's work without deference to job titles? Can the bulldozers in your group accept exclusion, as Jobs did, because they would throw the free flowing ideas off by their overpowering ways? Can human resources deal with grey areas between departments? Can one or more oppressive and demoralizing "layers" of approval (such as Disney's aptly-named "overseers," be eliminated?

You can read between the lines as Catmull gingerly explains how some could not align with their culture and thus departed. He also admits mistakes, including the fact that he cannot really know what's going on without being accessible to people beyond the syncophants, and how he is vigilant about noticing and listening rather than hiding behind pomp, circumstance and office space.



Some of the book travels into Oprah's book club "self actualization" territory with bromides and visualization exercises that are just as lovely as can be. However, I have seen this sort of thing before. The danger is if organizations use only the superficial material as a smokescreen for pretending to "embrace Pixar culture" at some blue sky meeting, give their version a cute name and launch it with "pep rallies," bells and whistles, -- and yet the organization goes back to where it was before, who is kidding who? You can't just check organizational change off a list and walk off, satisfied that it's over with.

Again, no matter what Catmull and his exceptional, insightful solutions may have done for Pixar, it must be noted that he is the head of the company. One of the most illuminating sections of the book deals with Catmull and the Pixar brass struggling through the muck and mire of a mismanaged Disney Animation. The truth is that, when a flawed administration takes command, even when it seems to have gone away, it still leaves a bathtub ring of like-minded people and ideas that sustain the previous mindset. Catmull and Company were able to cut through to the sincere people and get to the truth, even when -- I am certain -- it was cautiously guarded from them.

But could he have changed the culture if he wasn't the boss? He points out that there was a small faction already at Disney that was struggling to improve the system and creativity -- the "Story Trust." These creavtive people operated "under the radar" but could not make a difference until a change at the top blew the mucus out, allowing them to breathe freely in the sunshine. Small groups like this are everywhere. It's the smart leader that is secure enough to trust the person who isn't necessarily saying what he/she want to hear, but seeks out and trusts those who have true, constructive, caring passion for making a work environment the best it can be.

If you can do that, to paraphrase Kipling, then you've become a success, my friends.






DVD REVIEW: Sofia the First: The Floating Palace
Blog, TV
Posted on Apr 16 2014 by Greg


This is the third collection of episodes from the Disney Junior TV series. First was Once Upon a Princess (with Cinderella), second was Learning to Be a Princess (with Jasmine) and now The Floating Palace features an appearance by Ariel (voiced and sung by the wonderful Jodi Benson).

There are two kinds of Disney Junior series, educational (of the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse variety that encourage participation) and more story-driven ones like Sofia the First. I tend to prefer the latter, more linear plotting. Sofia is a fine example, with some fine songs by John Kavanaugh, too.

The Floating Palace (Season 1, Episode 22) 49 minutes
Original Air Date: November 24, 2013
This is a double-length show in which Sofia (voiced by Modern Family's Ariel Winter) becomes a mermaid and and Cedric (Jess Harnell) tries to steal a magic comb from Oona (Mad Men's Keirnan Shipka). Very much at the high quality of a direct-to-video Disney movie.
Song: "Here in Merway Cove," a big band/"Under the Sea"-type production number, sung by Benson and the Cast and "The Love We Share."

Tri-Kingdom Picnic (Season 1, Episode 10)
May 17, 2013
At annual games, a friendly competition between three kingdoms,  James (Zach Callison) learns how to be a good winner and a good loser.
Song: The Picnic of the Year" Sung by the Cast

Finding Clover (Season 1, Episode 13) 23 minutes
June 28, 2013
Thinking Sofia no longer needs him, Clover fills in as a magician's rabbit.
Song: "Why Did I Go?" Sung by Brady and Winter.
        
Make Way for Miss Nettle (Season 1, Episode 16) 23 minutes
August 23, 2013
Wanting to be "more magnificent than Maleficent," an egotistical fairy (Megan Mulally) schemes to steal the magic book from Flora, Fauna and Merryweather.
Song: "Make Way for Miss Nettle" Sung by Mulally.



As a bonus gift, this DVD package comes with two knitted bracelets with images of the sea woven into the design.









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