"WHAT DID YOU DO IN THE WAR, HORSEY?" @ 13 April 2012 06:42 PM
War Horse started as a children's novel in 1982 that more recently became an acclaimed stage show, a BBC radio drama and of course, it gets the full Steven Spielberg treatment in this Best Picture Oscar nominated epic. It's a DreamWorks film, and all of the studio's live action films are released by Walt Disney Pictures.

The film combines elements of the book and the stage production, but unlike the other versions, it is not told completely from the viewpoint of Joey, the horse, whose literal narration would not work as well in a film -- but the skill of the trainer, horse and director bring out remarkable "acting" in the lead equestrian

War Horse the movie is perhaps the most Disneyesque motion picture to come from director Spielberg. Especially in its opening segment, taking place in the rugged, breathtaking landscape of Devon, suggests the Disney sagas of yore such as The Three Lives of Thomasina, Darby O' Gill and especially the films Walt Disney produced entirely in the U.K.

It's very intense at times, since it is a war film, but the war scenes are heavy on spectacle and light on gore. The most difficult scene to watch, at least in our house, was the fate of the two very young German soldiers, which takes place on camera (and shot in a very evocative way at sunrise in the face of a windmill).

Every shot of War Horse is an experience in expert composition, art direction, authenticity and often understated acting. Spielberg, as seen in the very generous bonus materials, is an extremely collaborative filmmaker and knows how to best utilize the best talent in front and behind the lens, from the superb cast to the stirring music of longtime collaborator John Williams.



Rather than have an audio commentary or a simultaneous online compliment to the film itself, the second disc in this four-disc combo is loaded with background material, including a feature length documentary about the making of the film and several shorter items about specific collaborators. Spielberg himself hosts a short round table on camera with members of the cast and crew.

Storywise, War Horse suggests an earlier British children's classic, Black Beauty, in that is chronicles the various owners, friends and foes of one particular horse, with a grand coincidence to tie it together. I have to say -- without a trace of irony or sarcasm -- that it also reminds me, in part, of the song "Snoopy's Christmas," in which the WWI Flying Ace and the Red Baron suspend their deadly battle for a brief time because of a shared affinity (you'll know which scene I'm referring to if you saw the film already).

Since Spielberg and his creative team has meticulously crafted such a sweeping, magnificent film, it follow that it's particularly nice to see it on Blu-ray, which brings out every crag in the rugged countryside and the sheer size of the battle scenes, as well as some very lovely moments at a French country home.

This is the kind of movie that folks say isn't made anymore and can be a rich experience to share with family and friends.

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