DO SEQUELS WORK OR DO THEY NOT? @ 6 September 2012 04:19 PM
Walt Disney did not believe in sequels, at least as far as his animated features were concerned. He did not have a problem with Son of Flubber, The Monkey's Uncle, Savage Sam or Davy Crockett and the River Pirates, but these films surely were a different matter to him entirely.

Of course, debate and comment has never stopped since the direct-to-video release of The Return of Jafar. This sequel to Aladdin was so successful, it opened the door for direct-to-video (and occasional theatrical) releases of follow-ups (and even second follow-ups) to Bambi, Cinderella, Peter Pan, 101 Dalmatians, The Jungle Book, The Fox and the Hound, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Mulan, Brother Bear, Lilo and Stitch, The Emperor's New Groove and others I've probably left out. Lots of Pooh, too.

All of these sequels were produced by Walt Disney Television Animation, later known as DisneyToon Studios, on budgets far less then their originals and with staffs combining talents from around the world. With less money and a different working circumstance, one cannot expect every one of these sequels to strike the same chords.

However, it's not for lack of trying. Despite the constraints, some creative teams were often capable of remarkable results, especially if the team involved was emotionally invested in the original classic AND if there is a second story worthy of telling.

Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure seems a natural for a sequel, since Scamp himself was a popular comic book character for many years. The first movie laid some groundwork for Tramp's new life as a domestic dog.



The creators of the sequel emphatically yearned to recreate the magic of Walt Disney's 1955 canine family romance. For a art direction standpoint, they succeeded admirably. The background elements of Lady and the Tramp were mined for research and look almost exactly like the original. Animation poses were studied for accuracy. The degree to which these details were reached is worthy of celebration. This is one of the few sequels to feature an audio commentary (thank you!) and the folks involved were earnest indeed.

Perhaps more attention might have been given to the story (or, as in some corporate situations, perhaps it could have benefitted from less unnecessary meddling).

In hundreds of comics, Scamp was a cute puppy who got into mischief. For this film, Scamp is a lovable yet discontented adolescent (which distances him from some of the audience already). It's as if the script must undo something that was fine in the first film.

We get less time with our old friend Tramp (and even less with Lady, voiced by the heavenly Jodi Benson). In revisiting most of the same locations as the first story -- including the Italian restaurant, which is very clever -- the film can't keep from chewing its cabbage twice.

Still it's a pleasant film with very nice songs by the great Melissa Manchester and one of my favorite lyricists, Norman Gimbel (who worded "A Whale of a Tale" for 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, a hit parade of TV themes and the excellent Pufnstuf movie score).

Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World has the benefit of having lots of additional story left to tell so it doesn't lend itself to the repetition of some sequels. It's actually one of Disney's best direct-to-video sequels story-wise, since the first film kind of left things hanging.

Being a fictionalized biography, it is known that Pocahontas had quite a life after she met John Rolfe and moved to England. The film makes the most of every opportunity, from the My Fair Lady-like sequence in which the young maiden is versed in the English trappings for a grand ball to the inspiring way Pocahontas stands up to yet another king for what is right and true.

Whether or not most of the story actually happened is beside the point -- this is Hollywood, folks -- and there's even a disclaimer at the end of the credits encouraging viewers to read up on the real-life lady. Now that both Pocahontas and Pocahontas II are combined on one Blu-ray, the films fit together nicely.



One can dispute whether or which film has better songs, but why? Just enjoy the musical excellence in both: Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz in one, Marty Panzer and Larry Grossman in the other. Grossman is another of my musical heroes, having written the incredible "Just One Person" for the musical Snoopy. This gorgeous song became a Muppet Show icon (he wrote for that series, too). Bernadette Peters sang it to Kermit when he guest-hosted The Tonight Show and it was performed at Jim Henson's memorial service.

He also wrote another iconic song -- the countermelody, "Peace on Earth" for David Bowie to sing as Bing Crosby crooned "Little Drummer Boy" on Bing's last TV special. Both Pocahontas 1 & II soundtracks are currently available for download on amazon.

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