BOOK REVIEW: "Must Kill TV" by Emmy winner Ken Levine @ 12 December 2013 05:50 PM
Only a seasoned TV pro could have dreamed up this deliciously scathing dark comic journey through the labyrinth of the TV biz.

Ken Levine draws upon untold thousands of real-life jaw dropping moments he has encountered in the social, business and creative arenas of TV, and delivers a crisp satirical thriller that, while it may suggest other works along the same lines, is a fresh creation in itself.

The lead protagonist, over-promoted TV executive Charles Muncie, is not so much a character with whom the reader identifies as a set of eyes through which we peek behind the scenes and in the boudoir, where characters may not be what they seem and twists are as serpentine as they can really be in the creative and corporate world. Wait until you read how the sitcom -- upon which Charles' biggest success and his biggest moral dilemma -- got on the schedule. Let's put it this way. He took the credit -- and that's not a spoiler if you know work politics.

I could not help casting this story in my head as I read it. That was part of the fun. Levine's expertise in building characters and putting them into situations that are at once dark and yet very funny is a hallmark of his experience working on such shows as M*A*S*H, Frasier, Cheers, and the underappreciated Almost Perfect -- which gets a nod in the book, as "Blue Justice" was also the fictional TV show within that show.



Saying too much would spoil the fun and surprises of Must Kill TV. Suffice to say that I did not quite guess the "Oh NO!" moment at the heart of the book's denouement. But that's not even as much of a strange surprise as the fates that ultimately befall the major characters.

I read Ken Levine's blog every day, and based on what he has told readers about his real-life experiences, not EVERYONE in network TV is like this, nor are all the "non-pros." Just some.

Maybe a little more than just some.
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