BOOK REVIEW: "Sleigh Rides, Jingle Bells and Silent Nights" @ 15 December 2013 09:28 AM


TThis book is scholarly without being in the weeds and provides an intelligent examination of how Christmas evolved through its pop culture and musical progression. It certainly goes into an analytical depth that other books of this kind do not. Which is why there is a hole in it through which you could drive a truck.

I realize that the throwaway mention of "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as a TV special is within the context of a treatise of the American family and yes, Santa and Rudolph's dad are negatively depicted. But what is astonishingly ignored is that it is the single longest running network special in TV history and has much more to it thematically. How could one overlook that Johnny Marks wrote eight additional songs for the special -- one of which, "Holly Jolly Christmas" is also a standard?

The author mentions the often deleted verse of "Santa Claus is Comin' to Town," yet overlooks the verse as it was written for the TV special based on that song. There's discussion of how the lyrics for "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" were changed for Judy Garland. Shouldn't special lyrics for Fred Astaire also be mentioned?

How can one write a book about some of the greatest songs ever written yet briefly and arbitrarily dismiss the films they inspired -- particularly the musical aspects of these films? As an author, I know there are only so many pages in a work. However, one can limit extensive descriptions in one area to allow space for another.

No book can contain every song and that's why there are often follow up volumes. But the songs that are included should have benefited from having their cultural context more fully delineated by acknowledging the major and highly ubiquitous Rankin/Bass productions in which they still are seen and heard. We're talking generations of viewers (and listeners to their musical soundtracks) on TV, records and home video. More than a passing glance is needed.



This book really is well-written and it stacks up well against other books on the subject -- but because it aims a little higher, the omission becomes more glaring.

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